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Renewable Heat Incentive

The Renewable Heat Incentive is designed to provide financial support that encourages individuals, communities and businesses to switch from using fossil fuel for heating, to renewables such as wood fuel.

The Energy Saving Trust will be administering the Renewable Heat Premium Payment (RHPP) scheme as part of the RHI.

Government roll out of the scheme 

The Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) is a UK Government scheme set up to encourage uptake of renewable heat technologies among householders, communities and businesses through the provision of financial incentives. The UK Government expects the RHI to make a significant contribution towards their 2020 ambition of having 12 per cent of heating coming from renewable sources. The Renewable Heat Incentive is the first of its kind in the world.

There are two phases to the introduction of the RHI:

  • Phase 2: the domestic element of the RHI, is expected to be introduced in the summer of 2013 following the UK Government consultation. 

Solar thermal As part of the first phase, the Government will also introduce Renewable Heat Premium Payments for the domestic sector. They have ring-fenced funding of around £15 million, which will be used to make premium payments to households who install renewable heating. These direct payments will subsidise the cost of installing qualifying renewable heating systems. In return for the payments, participants will be asked to provide some feedback on how the equipment works in practice and suppliers will be asked to provide a follow up service on any issues that are raised. This will boost confidence in the technology and the information we receive will help enable Government, manufacturers, installers and consumers to better understand how to maximise performance of the various technologies. The Renewable Heat Premium Payments will support a spread of technologies across all regions of Great Britain and will cover households using gas and other fossil fuels.  This scheme was launched by Energy Saving Trust in July 2011. 

The Renewable Heat Premium Payment scheme has now been extended and was open for you to make an application from 1 May 2012. The financial support covers solar thermal hot water systems, heat pumps and biomass boilers with payments ranging from £300 to £1,250 depending on technology.

A second phase of RHI support including long-term tariff support for the domestic sector has been launched to coincide with the introduction of the Green Deal for Homes. People in receipt of the Renewable Heat Premium Payments will be able to receive long term RHI tariff support once these tariffs are introduced as will anybody who has installed an eligible installation since 15 July 2009.

The types of technologies you could install in your home are;

Find out more about this scheme from the Department for Energy and Climate Change

Frequently asked questions

Please visit Energy saving Trust website

UK heat map produced by DECC 

The National Heat Map was commissioned by the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) and created by The Centre for Sustainable Energy. The purpose of the Map is to support planning and deployment of local low-carbon energy projects in England.

How it was done

The National Heat Map is built from a bottom-up address level model of heat demand in England. The model estimates the total heat demand of every address in England, but based on published sub-national energy consumption statistics and without making use of metered energy readings.

Heat demand density web maps were produced from this model, covering Residential, Commercial, Industrial, Public Buildings (DECs) and Total heat demand.

In addition point locations for Combined Heat and Power plants and Power Stations were mapped along with Local Authority and regional boundaries.

For both residential and non-residential models, heat demand was first estimated at address level using a range of data sources. These estimates were then used in a weighted disaggregation of known small-area average heating fuel consumption.

It aims to achieve this by providing publicly accessible high-resolution web-based maps of heat demand by area.

View the heat map