Conservation areas

What is a conservation area?

A conservation area is an area of special architectural or historic interest the character or appearance of which it is desirable to preserve or enhance.

The residents and businesses in a conservation area all have an important part to play in preserving and enhancing the special character that led to its designation. We encourage high quality design for all development in a conservation area. Carefully designed new buildings and extensions, sensitive proposals for new signage and shop fronts and the sympathetic reuse of existing buildings can make a positive contribution to its character.  Insensitive development can harm the character that we are trying to protect.

Development in a conservation area

If you are looking to carry out any work in a conservation area, the following rules apply: 

  • Demolition of most buildings in the area are controlled, whether they are listed or not
  • Trees in the area are protected
  • Building design quality is strengthened, so that the area can be preserved and its character and appearance improved.

Conservation areas: city

City centre conservation area

The Peterborough city centre conservation area has a number of key landmark buildings that are iconic across the city centre and make a key contribution to its identity: the Cathedral, the Guildhall and the Church of St John the Baptist. In addition, it has a number of important civic spaces and squares, including Cathedral Square, St John’s Square, the Cathedral Precincts, and spaces along Bridge Street and Long Causeway. Commercial activities are most prominent throughout reflecting its city centre location.

The conservation area was designated in June 1969 to cover the whole of the city centre including the Cathedral Precincts, Cowgate and Priestgate to the west, Westgate to the north and extending southwards along Bridge Street. It is one of the first of the 29 conservation areas located within the Peterborough City Council area and was designated at the outset of the City’s expansion under the New Towns Act.

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Former Great Northern Railway Cottages conservation area

The Great Northern Railway Cottages conservation area is located approximately 3 miles north of the city centre. It is a small area containing two linear terraces of former railway workers cottages built by the Great Northern Railway Company from 1852 with a northern terrace of 25 cottages and a southern terrace of 34 cottages. The setting is very urban with street trees and small front gardens.

The conservation area was designated in March 2002 and the boundaries are industrial premises and employment uses to the west, and Lincoln Road to the east. To the south is the Triangle Public House (formerly the Locomotive Public House).

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Orton Longueville conservation area

The Orton Longueville conservation area is located approximately 3 miles to the west of Peterborough city centre.  Orton Longueville is a small village in the western suburbs of Peterborough.  The conservation area is characterised by a preserved historic core comprising the medieval Holy Trinity church and stone buildings dating from the 18th and 19th centuries.

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Orton Waterville conservation area

Orton Waterville is an old village, a former agricultural community, now part of the western suburbs of the city. The Orton Waterville conservation area is located approximately 3 miles to the west of Peterborough city centre. It encompasses the historic core of the village and is principally an area of housing but also includes a public house, commercial uses and two churches.

The conservation area was designated in October 1970 and the key boundaries are properties the east and west of Cherry Orton Road, Cherry Orton Road to the south and Oundle Road to the north.

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Park conservation area

The Park conservation area is located approximately 1 mile north of the city centre. It is principally an area of housing but also includes commercial uses, shops, and churches.

The conservation area was designated in September 1968. The boundary broadly follows that laid down by the Peterborough Land Company in 1876. The Peterborough Land Company sought investors to comprehensively develop land north of the city centre as a model housing area. Two main roads (Park Road and Broadway) were joined at their northern end by Park Crescent and Queens Drive with the Park as the focus of the estate.

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Queens Road conservation area

The Queens Road conservation area is a small area containing two housing terraces of 35 properties either side of Queens Road (numbers 1-70 inclusive) and built 1897-1898, located approximately 1 mile from the city centre.  The setting is very urban with street trees and small front gardens. The conservation area was designated in March 2002.

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Stanground conservation area

The Stanground conservation area is located approximately 2 miles from the city centre. The setting is very urban with street trees and small front gardens. It encompasses the historic core of the former village and is principally an area of housing but also includes commercial uses, shops, a public house and church.

The conservation area was designated in March 2002 and the key boundaries are properties to Church Street and North Street (west).

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Werrington conservation area

Werrington is an old village now part of the northern suburbs of the city and located approximately 5 miles Peterborough city centre. The Werrington conservation area
encompasses the historic core of the village and is principally an area of housing but also commercial uses, shops, public houses and churches.

The conservation area was designated in June 1969 and the key boundaries are properties to Church Street, to Lincoln Road and The Green eastwards to near Fulbridge Road.

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Conservation areas: villages (A to G)

Ailsworth conservation area

The Ailsworth conservation area is located approximately 5 miles to the west of Peterborough city centre and adjacent to its neighbouring village Castor. The conservation area includes a large proportion of the village and landscape to the north.

The conservation area was designated in August 1969. It is principally a residential area. The boundaries are the rear of properties to Helpston Road to the east, north along Helpston Road towards the by-pass, the rear boundaries of properties to Peterborough Road to the south and the village edge to the west.

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Bainton conservation area

The Bainton is a small village on the southern edge of the Welland valley and located approximately 7 miles to the north-east of Peterborough city centre. The conservation area encompasses the historic core of the village and much of the historic parkland to Bainton House. The form of the conservation area is derived from the main street pattern of Tallington Road and the east–west Barnack and Helpston Roads through the village.

The conservation area was designated in November 1976 and the boundaries are Barnack Road and Helpston Road (B1443) and adjoining properties to the south, parts of Meadowgate, and properties to Helpston Road to the east, field boundaries to the west and field boundaries and parkland to Bainton House to the north.

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Barnack conservation area

Barnack lies in the Welland valley, 10 miles north-west of Peterborough city centre and four miles from Stamford. It is a historic settlement located in rolling limestone country surrounded by arable farmland. The Barnack conservation area encompasses the historic core of the village and is principally an area of housing but also includes a school, shop, public house and two churches.

The conservation area was designated in June 1975 and extended in 1990 to include the southern approach to the village and parts of Walcot Hall and to the north-west along Stamford Road and Wittering Road.

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Castor conservation area

Castor is a substantial village, surrounded by agricultural land to the north, south and east and adjoins Ailsworth to the west. The village is located approximately five miles west of Peterborough city centre. It is a unique historic settlement located north of the flood plain of the River Nene. The Castor conservation area is principally an area of housing but also includes a shop, school, public houses, farm and a church.

The conservation area was designated in August 1969. The conservation area encompasses the historic core of the village.

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Deeping Gate conservation area

Deeping Gate is a small settlement located on the south bank of the River Welland on the western edge of the fens and located approximately 9 miles north of Peterborough city centre. It is principally a residential area. The Deeping Gate conservation area encompasses the historic core of the village.

The conservation area was designated in August 1969 and the boundaries are numbers. 9 and 12 Riverside to the east, number 37 Riverside to the west, the rear gardens of properties to Riverside to the south and Sutton Lane to the north.

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Etton conservation area

Etton is a small fen edge settlement located approximately 6 miles north of Peterborough city centre. The conservation area encompasses the historic core of the village. It is principally a residential area with two farms, and a church.

The conservation area was designated in October 1990 and the boundaries are the rear of properties on Main Road to the east, field boundaries to the south and south east of Main Road to the south, the rear of properties on Main Road and Rectory Lane to the west and field boundaries at Church Farm, Church of St Stephen and farm buildings to the north of Etton Manor.

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Eye conservation area

The Eye conservation area is located approximately 6 miles east of Peterborough city centre. It is principally an area of housing but also includes a number of shops and commercial uses on High street, a public house, and a church.

The conservation area was designated in March 2002 and the boundaries are the rear of buildings to High Street to the south and south, the junction of Crowland Road and High Street to the east and the junction of Hodney Road and High Street to the west.

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Glinton conservation area

The Glinton conservation area is located approximately 6 miles to the north of Peterborough city centre. It is set round the historic core of the village and St Benedict’s Church and is principally an area of housing but also includes two shops, school, a public house, and a church.

The conservation area was designated in June 1975 and the boundaries are North Fen Road to the north and field boundaries, Manor Farm and fields to the east, Welmore Road to the south and Lincoln Road to the west.

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Conservation areas: villages (H to N)

Helpston conservation area

The Helpston conservation area is located approximately 6 miles to the north west of Peterborough city centre. The nucleus of the conservation area is formed by the historic core of the village. It is principally an area of housing but also includes a shop, farms, commercial uses, a public house, and a church.

The conservation area was designated in June 1975 and the boundaries are West Street, and Church Lane to the north, Glinton Road and Woodgate to the east, Broad Wheel Road to the south and West street to the west.

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Longthorpe conservation area

Longthorpe is a small village in the western suburbs of Peterborough some 2 miles to the city centre. Originally a village on the fringe of the city, the suburb developed rapidly around the village from the 1970s under the expansion of city led by the Peterborough New Town. The Longthorpe conservation area is characterised by a preserved historic core comprising the medieval parish Church of St Botolph, stone buildings dating from the 18th and 19th centuries and Thorpe Hall and its historic parkland.

The conservation area was designated in June 1969 and the boundaries are the parkland boundary of Thorpe Hall to the east, modern housing development to rear of Longthorpe Tennis Club and adjacent to Holywell Way to the south west, Longthorpe Tower, Longthorpe Tower House to the west, and the rear of properties to Thorpe Road to the north.

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Marholm conservation area

The Marholm conservation area is located approximately 4 miles to the west of Peterborough city centre. It covers the whole village except for the 20th century housing along the south side of Walton Road and is principally an area of housing but also includes two farms, a public house, and a church.

The conservation area was designated in October 1990 and the boundaries are field boundary between Burmer Wood and Castor Road to the south, Castor Road, Woodcroft Road and Marholm Farm to the east, field boundaries at Home Farm, Manor House and Poplar Farm to the west and field boundary at Waterend cottage to the north.

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Maxey conservation area

The Maxey conservation area is located approximately 7 miles to the north west of Peterborough city centre. It encompasses the historic core of the village and is principally an area of housing but also includes two farms, commercial uses, and a public house.

The conservation area was designated in September 1979 and the key boundaries are West End Road and Castle End to the north and High Street to the south.

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Northborough conservation area

The Northborough conservation area is located approximately 7 miles to the north of Peterborough city centre. It encompasses the historic core of the village and is principally an area of housing but also includes a farm, commercial uses, a public house and church.

The conservation area was designated in November 1979 and the boundaries are Northborough Manor, Castle Farm, Manor Farm and gardens of properties to Church Street to the south, Lincoln Road to the west, rear boundaries of properties to Church Street and Church Farm to the north and Paradise Lane to the east.

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Conservation areas: villages (P to W)

Peakirk conservation area

The Peakirk conservation area is located approximately 5 miles to the north east of Peterborough city centre. It encompasses the historic core of the village and is principally an area of housing but also includes commercial uses, a public house and church.

The conservation area was designated in December 1979 and the boundaries are St Pega’s Road to the east and south, field boundaries to the Old Rectory and continuing south to St Pega’s Road to the west, part of Deeping Road and continuing along field boundaries to the north.

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Pilsgate conservation area

Pilsgate is a small settlement located approximately 11 miles north-west of Peterborough city centre. The Pilsgate conservation area covers most of the village and is principally an area of housing.

The conservation area was designated in November 1979 and the boundaries are Pudding Bag Lane to the east, Lattimers Paddock to the north west and farm and field boundaries west of Stamford Road.

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Southorpe conservation area

Southorpe is a small settlement located approximately 8 miles west of Peterborough city centre. The conservation area covers the whole village and is principally an area of housing and landscape to the east.

The conservation area was designated in October 1990 and the key boundaries are the disused railway line to the east, and the rear of properties and field paddocks to Main Street.

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Sutton conservation area

Sutton is a small village located approximately 7 miles to the west of Peterborough city centre. The Sutton conservation area encompasses most of the settlement and is principally an area of housing but also includes a church.

The conservation area was designated in December 1979 and the boundaries are tightly drawn around the settlement.

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Thorney conservation area

Thorney is a village some 8 miles to the east of Peterborough city centre. The Thorney conservation area covers all of the planned agricultural settlement of the Duke of Bedford estate and the historic core around The Green and Abbey Place. It is principally an area of housing but also includes commercial uses, shops, a public house and church.

The conservation area was designated in March 1974 and the boundaries are Wisbech Road, Station Road, Abbey Place, The Green, Church Street and parts of Whittlesey Road.

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Thornhaugh conservation area

The Thornhaugh conservation area is located approximately 8 miles to the west of Peterborough city centre. It covers much of the settlement and is principally an area of housing but also includes a church and farm.

The conservation area was designated in September 1979 and the boundaries are properties to Russell Hill and Meadow Lane.

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Ufford conservation area

Ufford is located approximately 9 miles to the north-west of Peterborough city centre. The conservation area includes a large proportion of the village and its historic core. It is principally an area of housing but also includes commercial uses, a public house and church.

The conservation area was designated in June 1975 and the boundaries are field boundaries east of Main Street, Newport Farm barns and The Old Rectory to the south and boundaries south of Walcot Road and running north adjacent to the cricket ground and continuing within the Parkland to Ufford Hall and Ufford Farm.

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Wansford conservation area

The village of Wansford lies on the northern bank of the River Nene, adjacent to the A1 and located approximately 8 miles west of Peterborough city centre. The nucleus of the Wansford conservation area is formed by the historic core of the village. It encompasses the historic core of the village and is principally an area of housing but also includes a church.

The conservation area was designated in September 975 and the boundaries are properties to Old Leicester Road, Peterborough Road, Old North Road and Bridge End.

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