Arranging a cremation

The choice of cremation or burial is ultimately decided by the person responsible for arranging the funeral.  It may be that the deceased has already expressed their wishes in the form of a will or a funeral plan, which may influence the decision. Cultural requirements may also be a factor when deciding between burial and cremation.

On this page:

Charter for the Bereaved

As members of the Charter for the Bereaved we aim to ensure that each service is meaningful and meets you and your family's needs. A full copy of the charter is available from the Institute of Cemetery and Crematorium Management website.

Booking a cremation

In most circumstances a funeral director would be instructed by the family, or executor, to make the funeral arrangements. The funeral director will book the date and time with the crematorium and will have the application forms required for completion. Providing there is some flexibility with date or time (to allow us to honour prior bookings), our service aim is to provide a cremation within five working days of the booking request.

The chapel can be booked at 30 minute intervals, on the hour or half hour, to permit a service time of twenty minutes. If you do require a longer service time, to personalise your service, one hour bookings are available (fifty minute service time) subject to a small additional fee.

Funeral Directors

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Family arranged funerals

We recognise the right to organise a funeral without the use of a funeral director. Further in formation is available on the family arranged funerals page

Type of service

Any recognised form of service, religious or civil, may be held in the non-denominational chapel, which seats approximately 80 people with additional standing room at the rear. You can choose to have the main service at your local church, with a short committal service at the crematorium, or you can have the whole service at the crematorium with or without any form of service. 

If you are expecting a large congregation at the crematorium, you are advised to book an extended service time of up to 50 minutes to allow time for the congregation to enter and leave the chapel. Large congregations can rarely be accommodated within the basic service time of 20 minutes without the service giving the impression of being 'rushed'. 

An extended service time is also appropriate for those families who prefer a longer service with personal tributes and readings, or expecting a large congregation and/or a Horse Drawn Hearse.

Arriving at the crematorium

You can arrange to meet the funeral director at the crematorium or have the option of the funeral cortege leaving from a home address. The Chapel Attendant will open the doors for you to enter the Chapel as soon as the previous service has left. To avoid causing distress to other families, please do not enter the Chapel until invited to do so.

Entering the chapel

Five minutes is allowed for the mourners to enter the chapel. To facilitate this friends, colleagues and relatives (other than immediate family) enter the Chapel immediately, whilst the coffin is being removed from the hearse. The front rows of seats are generally reserved for the immediate family, as advised in advance by the funeral director.

The Officiant leads the procession of the coffin and members of the immediate family of the deceased follow into the chapel. The family then occupy the reserved row(s) of seating, at the front. Although our chapel seats approximately 80 people, the service can be relayed through speakers and television screens to the covered area outside the chapel.  

Music

Music may be played while mourners are entering the Chapel. This music is normally 'faded out' when everyone has entered the chapel allowing the service to continue without interruption.

As part of the service you can have one or two hymns, or music of your choice. Accompaniment to hymns can be recorded music, with a discreet backing choir if required, or 'live organ music.' If you require an organist, please arrange this with the funeral director.

We have a 'state of the art' music system that does not require tapes or CD's, you can search our extensive music catalogue on the Wesley Media website. If the music you require is not listed, your funeral director can arrange for most commercially available music to be sent to the crematorium via our music supplier.

Recording the service

The crematorium offers the facility for the funeral service to be recorded, subject to an additional fee. This can be provided as an audio CD, DVD, or alternatively a webcast which can offer family and friends that are unable to attend the service the option to view a live broadcast. We also offer families the option to order a visual tribute showing photographs or video footage during the service. These can all be requested through your funeral director. 

The committal

During the committal music of your choice can be played as the curtains close. Please advise your funeral director if you do not wish the curtains to close at the committal. If you wish the music to be played in full at this time please inform the funeral director.

Close of service

Music of your choice may be played whilst the mourners leave the Chapel for which an allowance of 5 minutes is made within the scheduled 30 minute service time. You will be guided through the exit at the rear of the Chapel, which will take you to the floral tribute area. If you are to be collected by your funeral director in a limousine, this will be waiting for you adjacent to this area.

Including your funeral arrangements in your will

Not only does a will give you a chance to say who you would like to receive your estate when you die, but it also allows you to make clear instructions about your funeral arrangements. For example you can specify burial or cremation, information about prepayment plans and even music requirements and memorials. 

These instructions are not binding in law and it will be necessary to ensure that the person instructed (the executor) is someone who is likely to carry out the wishes of the deceased. The final decision will be made by the executors.