Full Planning Permission (Change of use ONLY) (PF04)

The Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order 1987 (as amended) puts all uses of land and buildings into various use categories.

If you are proposing to change the use of a building or land you may need to apply for planning permission. To check whether permission is required please refer to the Planning Portal guidance.

If planning permission is needed you will need to apply using the Application for Full Planning Permission form. The list below details the documents you may need to submit to support an application purely to change the use of land or a building. If additional works are proposed that materially affect the external appearance of the building, please refer to the Full Planning Permission option in the drop-down selection above.

The statutory determination period for this type of applicaion is 13 weeks from the date the application is valid for a major development, 8 weeks in all other cases.

Guidance Notes

What you need to submit

The list below details supporting documents that may need to be submitted as part of your application. Please refer to each section below in order to determine whether or not you need to submit it as part of your application.

Always required

Please ensure that you have completed every section of the application form before submitting. Where sections or questions are not relevant please state this on the form.

The associated help file for this type of application can be found here

Apply using

Please note

"Apply online" websites are provided by private companies who may charge additional fees for their services. Peterborough City Council offer no technical support for customers using these sites, if you encounter an issue please contact the relevant website service helpdesk. If you opt to download and complete the application form instead it is your responsibility to ensure that the forms, the appropriate supporting documentation and correct fee are sent to Peterborough City Council either by email or post.

The relevant certificate must be completed, signed and dated (part of application form). Only one certificate should be completed.

Certificate A should be completed if the applicant is the sole owner of the land to which the application relates or holds an unexpired lease with a term of 7 or more years remaining.

Certificate B should be completed if the applicant is not the sole owner but knows the names and addresses of all the other owners.

The Notice to Owners (Notice 1) must also be completed and sent to all known owners.

A copy of the notice must be sent with the application to the local authority.

Certificate C should be completed if the applicant does not own all of the land to which the application relates and does not know the name and address of all of the owners.

The Notice to Owners (Notice 1) must be completed and sent to all known owners.

Where the owner is unknown the Notice to Unknown Owners (Notice 2) needs to be published in a local newspaper.

A copy of the notice must be sent with the application to the local authority.

Certificate D should be completed if the applicant does not own all of the land to which the application relates and does not know the names and addresses of any of the owners.

The Notice to Unknown Owners (Notice 2) needs to be published in a local newspaper.

A copy of the notice must be sent with the application to the local authority.

Updated: February 2017
Status:
 National requirement
Source: Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) Order 2015

Always required, except where the application:

  • is solely for providing access for disabled persons to or within a building or premises to which members of the public are admitted;
  • is the first revision of an application for development of the same character or description on the same site by the same applicant within 12 months of making the earlier application if withdrawn or the date of decision if granted or refused and NOT a duplicate application made by the same applicant within 28 days;

For details of our planning fees please see the fee schedule

You can now pay online directly to Peterborough City Council.

Status: National requirement
Source: Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) Order 2015

Always required

This must be an up-to-date Ordnance Survey based location plan at an appropriate scale, usually 1:1250 or 1:2500. In the case of large sites other drawing scales maybe appropriate.

The plan must show:

  • at least 2 main roads and all surrounding buildings or land;
  • the application site (the whole planning unit) ;
  • a north point;
  • a scale bar.

The application site boundary should be edged clearly with a red line. It should include all land necessary to carry out the proposed development; for example, land required for access to the site from a public highway, visibility splays, landscaping, car parking and open areas around buildings.

A blue line should be drawn around any other land owned by the applicant, close to or adjoining the application site.

We will expect this to be on an A4 size plan or larger.

A sample location plan can be viewed here.

Ordnance Survey map extracts are available from any Ordnance Survey Mapping and Data Centre.

The plan used should:

  • Not be a Land Registry document
  • Not be used for multiple applications
  • Show OS Crown copyright as an acknowledgement
  • Not be a photocopy or screen grab image
  • Not to be copied from existing OS mapping, if using hand drawn maps such as standard streets
  • Show the correct licence number if you wish to print or copy maps for applications
Copyright information

Please be aware that plans based on Ordnance Survey data are Crown copyright and other plans and drawings are the copyright of their authors. The details of any applicable copyright should appear on the original plans concerned. Using copyright protected plans could result in legal action being taken against you by the copyright holder. You are advised to contact the copyright holder before using such plans in making any application.

Updated: February 2017
Status:
 National requirement
Source: Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) Order 2015

Always required

Existing site layout plans to a recognised scale (1:100, 1:200 or 1:500 as appropriate)

The Site Layout Plan should show:

  • the direction of North;
  • a scale bar or metric measurements;

In addition, the Site Layout Plan should show the following unless these would not influence or be affected by the proposed development:

  • all the buildings, roads and footpaths on land adjoining the site including access arrangements;
  • all public rights of way crossing or adjoining the site (footpath, bridleway, restricted byway or byway open to all traffic);
  • the position of all trees on the site, and those on adjacent land;
  • the extent and type of any hard surfacing;
  • boundary treatment including walls or fencing;
  • existing car parking and turning arrangements.
  • any existing bin and cycle stores.

Please ensure that all plans submitted as part of your application are accurately labelled and numbered.

A sample block plan can be viewed here.

Ordnance Survey map extracts are available from Planning Services or any Ordnance Survey Mapping and Data Centre.

Status: National requirement
Source: Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) Order 2015

Always required

Proposed site layout plans to a recognised scale (1:100, 1:200 or 1:500 as appropriate)

The Site Layout Plan should show:

  • the direction of North;
  • a scale bar or metric measurements;

In addition, the Site Layout Plan should show the following unless these would not influence or be affected by the proposed development:

  • all the buildings, roads and footpaths on land adjoining the site including access arrangements;
  • all public rights of way crossing or adjoining the site (footpath, bridleway, restricted byway or byway open to all traffic);
  • the position of all trees on the site, and those on adjacent land;
  • the extent and type of any hard surfacing;
  • boundary treatment including walls or fencing
  • proposed car parking and turning arrangements.
  • proposed bin and cycle stores.

A sample block plan can be viewed here.

Please ensure that all plans submitted as part of your application are accurately labelled and numbered.

Ordnance Survey map extracts are available from Planning Services or any Ordnance Survey Mapping and Data Centre.

Status: National requirement
Source: 
Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) Order 2015

Required where multiple uses are proposed in one building or where the change of use is to residential.

Drawings showing the full existing floor layout plans to an appropriate scale, usually 1:100 and with a scale bar or metric measurements included.

Drawings must show the complete building, partial drawings are not acceptable.

Please ensure that all plans submitted as part of your application are accurately labelled and numbered.

Status: National requirement
Source: Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) Order 2015

Required where multiple uses are proposed in one building or where the change of use is to residential.

Drawings showing the full proposed floor layout plans to an appropriate scale, usually 1:100 and with a scale bar or metric measurements included.

Drawings must show the complete building, partial drawings are not acceptable.

Please ensure that all plans submitted as part of your application are accurately labelled and numbered.

Status: National requirement
Source: Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) Order 2015

Required if proposing building works that materially affect the external appearance of the building. See Full Planning Permission for details.

Required if proposing building works that materially affect the external appearance of the building. See Full Planning Permission for details.

Required if proposing building works that materially affect the external appearance of the building. See Full Planning Permission for details.

This not part of the local list.

Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is governed by the Town and Country Planning (Environmental Impact Assessment) Regulations 2011 (hereafter called the regulations).

The regulations set out the procedures to be followed by both applicants and local planning authorities where a development project may have significant impact upon the environment. This brief note is no substitute for these regulations and in most instances applicants proposing the sort of development likely to be subject to EIA will seek advice from their own consultants.

The type of development requiring submission of an Environmental Statement (ES – the document that will need to accompany a planning application if the proposal is EIA development) will fall into two categories as set out in Schedule 1 and Schedule 2 to the regulations.

Schedule 1 development lists a variety of development types with thresholds where submission of an ES is mandatory.
Schedule 2 development lists a variety of development types with thresholds which if met, require the local planning authority (LPA) to determine if the development is EIA development or not. This process is called adopting a “screening opinion.”

Screening opinions

An applicant or developer can, under the regulations request that the LPA (or the relevant Secretary of State) provide a screening opinion prior to the submission of an application. The LPA will take into account various factors such as scale of the development, its location in terms of the surrounding type of environment and how severe the impacts might be. Such criteria is listed in Schedule 3 to the regulations.

If a developer is unsure whether a proposal is EIA development or not, we advise that a request for a screening opinion is submitted at the earliest possible stage in the development process and well before submission of a planning application. At present screening opinion requests do not require a fee and the requirements for requesting a screening opinion are set out in Part 5 of the regulations. The LPA has 21 days to respond to such requests.

Where a screening opinion has not been carried out

If an application is submitted which might appear to require a screening opinion, the LPA can treat such application as requiring a screening opinion before accepting the submission as a validly made planning application. In such rare occasions we will adopt a screening opinion (within 21 days) before validating an application and undertaking consultation.

If the application requires an Environmental Statement and does not have one, we will encourage the applicant not to submit the application until the ES is ready. Otherwise the application will be made invalid.

Applications which are for EIA development are subject to particular consultation including newspaper notices and site notices. Therefore whether development is or is not EIA development needs to be clear before validation and consultation takes place. This is to ensure legal requirements are fulfilled, the proposals are publicly available and anyone with an interest has a fair opportunity to make their views known.

Should a screening opinion be issued which states that the proposed project is EIA development, the developer can then submit an outline of the matters the developer considers should form part of the ES. The LPA must respond to such requests within 5 weeks. The LPA reply is called the “scoping opinion.” There is presently no fee to make a scoping request.

Both screening requests/opinions and scoping requests/opinions are publicly available documents and will be published as such on our website.

Note: The regulations are being reviewed by the government in light of the decision to leave the European Union but are likely to be retained in a similar form for the time being.

Updated: February 2017
Status: Local requirement
Source: Town and Country Planning (Environmental Impact Assessment) (England and Wales) Regulations 2011 (SI 2011 No 1824).

Required for developments for the creation of retail and/or leisure floorspace greater than 2,500 square metres in out of town centre locations, which are not in accordance with the currently adopted development plan.

This should include an assessment of:

  • the impact of the proposal on existing, committed and planned public and private investment in a centre or centres in the catchment area of the proposal; and
  • the impact of the proposal on town centre vitality and viability, including local consumer choice and trade in the town centre and wider area, up to five years from the time the application is made. For major schemes where the full impact will not be realised in five years, the impact should also be assessed up to ten years from the time the application is made.

Additionally require a sequential test for all main town centre uses that are not located in the city centre, a district or local centre in accordance with paragraph 24 of the NPPF.  Main town centre uses are defined in the glossary to the National Planning Practice Guidance.

Status: Local requirement
Source: National Planning Policy Framework, para 26 (March 2012)

Required for all developments that are likely to generate significant amounts of movement.

It should include all existing and proposed commercial and residential vehicular and pedestrian movements to and from the site. Loading areas and arrangements for manoeuvring, servicing and parking of vehicles should also be clearly identified. It should describe and analyse existing transport conditions, how the development would affect those conditions and any measures proposed to overcome any problems.

Larger scale development proposals, the assessment should illustrate accessibility to the site by all modes of transport, and the likely modal split of journeys to and from the site.

It should also give details of proposed measures to improve access by public transport, walking and cycling, to reduce the need for parking associated with the proposal and to mitigate transport impacts.

Minor developments which will have some traffic implications but not significant enough to warrant a full transport assessment, a transport statement must be included but this can be included in the Design and Access Statement (under access) or in a Planning Statement etc. It must briefly set out the traffic implications of the development and how the design and layout of the proposal responds to this.

Indicative thresholds can be found in Appendix B of the DfT Guidance.

Further guidance can be found in the Manual for Streets and Guidance on Transport Assessment published by the DfT (March 2007).

Status: Local requirement
Source: National Planning Policy Framework, para 32 (March 2012)

Required for all new development which gives rise to potential noise nuisance and/or vibration to surrounding area and for all new residential development that may be subject to noise nuisance from adjacent sites or trunk roads.

Updated: February 2017
Status:
 Local requirement
Source: Policy PP3 the Peterborough Planning Policies DPD

Biodiversity Checklist - May be required

The Biodiversity checklist for Minor Proposals is required for all household and minor development which creates new floorspace (minor development is that which falls below the thresholds for major development)

The Biodiversity checklist for Major Proposals is required for all major development except where the development is change of use only. 

We require the checklist to be completed because we have a duty to consider the conservation of biodiversity when determining all types of planning application; this includes having regard to safeguarding of species protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010 (The Habitats Regulations) and the Badgers Act 1992.

If you answer "yes" to the questions in the checklist you will be required to carry out a survey or obtain a statement from a suitably qualified ecologist. Please see the checklists for the requirements.

Further guidance for developers on how to incorporate and take account of biodiversity in developments;

Status: Local requirement